Blog RSS https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/ en New Junior League gift celebrates 100 years of support https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/jln <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New Junior League gift celebrates 100 years of support</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/13/2022 - 16:37</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/168" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to New Junior League gift celebrates 100 years of support"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="JLN" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28JLN%20Wall%20Reveal%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" width="900" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>New Junior League gift celebrates 100 years of support</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> In a special ceremony in June to mark the milestone anniversary and partnership, the Junior League of Nashville committed another $1.5 million to Children’s Hospital. The centennial anniversary gift, part of the Junior League’s ninth supplemental agreement with Children’s Hospital, will go to support the hospital’s pediatric rehabilitation efforts. </h4> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%;} .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 75%} /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FZNI629omsA"></iframe></div> </center> <p>For 100 years, the Junior League of Nashville has been a champion of children’s health care, impacting the lives of countless patients and families through its commitment to service and philanthropy.</p> <p> </p> <p>The group has a rich legacy that features a long-standing partnership with Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, carrying out a collective vision to ensure quality, compassionate health care for children. Through volunteerism and transformative gifts, the Junior League has helped shape crucial health care initiatives and established numerous foundational programs at Children’s Hospital.</p> <p> </p> <p>In a special ceremony in June to mark the milestone anniversary and partnership, the Junior League of Nashville committed another $1.5 million to Children’s Hospital. The centennial anniversary gift, part of the Junior League’s ninth supplemental agreement with Children’s Hospital, will go to support the hospital’s pediatric rehabilitation efforts.</p> <p> </p> <p>“It was mind-blowing to learn that the state of Tennessee does not have an in-patient rehabilitation facility for our children. This is such a critical part of traumatic injury or major surgery recovery. As the Junior League’s partnership with Vanderbilt has evolved, what has remained steadfast is our dedication to addressing unmet needs in our community. Our centennial gift underscores this commitment,” said Jenny Barker, Junior League of Nashville President (2021-2022).</p> <p> </p> <p>“In this full-circle moment, we are making a gift that looks to the future, with a focus on family-centered care while paying tribute to the past. With this gift we are helping provide a bridge to healing — a place where children can fully recover.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Over the years, the Junior League has given nearly $20 million, including the latest gift, and thousands of volunteer hours.</p> <p> </p> <p>This gift will establish the endowed Junior League of Nashville Directorship in Pediatric Rehabilitation for a physician, yet to be named, to lead pediatric rehabilitation initiatives at Children’s Hospital. It will also be used to create an endowed fund that will help grow the pediatric rehabilitation program and related patient- and family-centered care well into the future.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>“The generosity and caring spirit of the Junior League aligns with our mission to heal and support children and their families, and this gift is emblematic of the deep community-minded relationship between the two organizations. A dedicated pediatric rehabilitation program will empower children and families in moments that shake them to their core. The legacy of this gift will ripple throughout communities for generations to come,” said Jeff Balser, MD, PhD, President and Chief Executive Officer of Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Dean of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>During the ceremony, Children’s Hospital leaders joined with Junior League representatives to sign the supplemental agreement and to commemorate the centennial anniversary.</p> <p> </p> <p>Meg Rush, MD, MMHC, president of Children’s Hospital, also unveiled the new Junior League of Nashville history wall on the second floor of the hospital. The wall includes multiple panels that open to showcase the extensive partnership between the Junior League and Children’s Hospital over the past century, and features photos and stories of the many patients helped through various programs.</p> <p> </p> <p>“Starting a century ago and continuing today, the Junior League of Nashville has had a vision of what children’s health care could and should be. Time and time again, the Junior League has come together through special programs, volunteerism and philanthropy to support the children and families in our community and at Children’s Hospital,” said Rush.</p> <p> </p> <p>“It is fitting that for the centennial anniversary, the Junior League’s latest generosity connects back to its roots in rehabilitative medical care for children by supporting pediatric rehabilitation efforts at Children’s Hospital. We are tremendously grateful to the Junior League for its enduring partnership, now and for many more years to come.”</p> <p> </p> <p>The Junior League of Nashville’s partnership with Vanderbilt dates back to 1923, when the Junior League Home for the Crippled Children opened. The home provided free convalescent and rehabilitative medical care for children with polio and other diseases.</p> <p> </p> <p>In 1971, the home moved to what was then called Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.</p> <p> </p> <p>Through the years, the Junior League’s gifts have helped support the Junior League Family Resource Center, the Child Life Program, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Development Follow-up Clinic, the Junior League Sickle Cell Disease and Asthma Program and many more programs. Previous gifts also include providing capital to help build the freestanding Children’s Hospital that opened in 2004, and again in 2016 to help support the hospital’s Growing to New Heights Campaign to build the most recent four-floor expansion.</p> <p> </p> <p>The Junior League also provided the groundwork for comprehensive maternal fetal care programming at Vanderbilt more than a decade ago when it made a transformative gift to improve care for pregnant women and their infants. The League enabled programming to get off the ground, expand and set the foundation for what is now The Reed Family Maternal Fetal Clinic.</p> <p> </p> <p>Volunteer work is also an important tenet of every gift the Junior League makes to Children’s Hospital. Prior to COVID-19, in-person volunteers hosted special events for patients and families and spent time with patients in the hospital playrooms and at the bedside, whether to play a board game or offer companionship. Behind the scenes they have ensured the hospital has items for the comfort cart, which provides travel-size personal items and snacks for patients’ families. During COVID with social distancing and public health safety measures in place, the Junior League pivoted to ensure their volunteer mission endured with efforts like playing bingo virtually with patients, putting together activity kits and delivering notes to front-line health care workers.</p> <p> </p> <p>“It was apparent from the beginning of my Child Life journey that the Junior League of Nashville volunteers would be an integral part of our team at Children’s Hospital,” said Stephanie Van Dyke, director of Child Life and Volunteer Services. “Their support continues to be a difference-maker in how we are able to provide the very best medical and psychosocial care for children, teens and their families.”</p> <p> </p> <p><em>by Christina Echegaray</em></p> <p> </p> <p>See the story in the VUMC Reporter <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2022/07/07/new-junior-league-gift-celebrates-100-years-of-support/"><strong>here</strong></a>.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="JLN" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/20220602DJ89.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="JLN" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/20220602DJ98.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 13 Jul 2022 21:37:28 +0000 hallk19 168 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Donor Spotlight: The Barbours https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/barbour <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Donor Spotlight: The Barbours</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 14:44</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/166" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Donor Spotlight: The Barbours"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="The Barbours" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28The%20Barbours%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>DONOR SPOTLIGHT</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center">After years of declining health from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), Richard Barbour underwent a double lung transplant at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.</h4> <p> </p> <p>A dramatic improvement in health following the transplant was remarkable to witness, recalls his wife, Elizabeth “Betsy” Barbour. </p> <p> </p> <p>“I can’t imagine anything that I’ll ever see in my lifetime that would be more amazing than that,” said Betsy. </p> <p> </p> <p>Richard lived five and one-half years after his transplant. He died at age 53. But Betsy doesn’t see his death as a failure. Instead, his transplant allowed him to live life to the fullest. </p> <p> </p> <p>After the procedure, Richard became passionate about helping others needing transplants, and his family intends to keep that support going. </p> <p> </p> <p>Through annual payments and designating the Medical Center to receive her life insurance, Betsy, with her family, was able to create an endowment in Richard’s name that will support the assistance fund and lung disease research. </p> <p> </p> <p>“I doubt that Richard would have guessed that giving to Vanderbilt on this level could be an option for us. I know he would be extremely gratified that his desire to give back can live on after him,” said Betsy.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>"I know that Richard’s transplant will always be the greatest miracle I’ve ever witnessed. And knowing that his endowment will continue to grow and help others is a great comfort to our family." — Betsy Barbour, Richard’s wife</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Betsy Barbour" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Betsy%20Barbour.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>To read more about the Barbours and their story, click <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2019/07/25/couples-transplant-journey-continues-by-helping-others/?_ga=2.103146308.556485214.1645464892-1986281539.1645194003"><strong>here</strong></a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 19:44:50 +0000 hallk19 166 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org A Family’s Lifeline during COVID-19 https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/rummo-family <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Family’s Lifeline during COVID-19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 14:30</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/165" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to A Family’s Lifeline during COVID-19"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Maddie Hayes" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Maddie%20Hayes%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>A Family’s Lifeline during COVID-19</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> When a patient is nearing the end of life under normal circumstances, family members would be called, chaplains would be brought in and the dying would be surrounded by loved ones. But for patients infected with COVID-19, that unfortunately is not possible. Many family members now can only say goodbye over an iPad, unable to be there for their loved one’s final moments. </h4> <p> </p> <p>But for one patient at Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s special COVID-19 unit, a selfless hero helped his family stay with him until he took his last breath. That hero was nurse Maddie Hayes, and the family of 81-year-old Frank Rummo will be forever grateful for the selfless nurse who gave them the chance to say goodbye and who provided their dad with the physical comfort they could not provide. </p> <p> </p> <p>After contracting COVID-19 in late March, Frank was rushed to the hospital on his 81st birthday in April with shortness of breath. After initially improving, Frank began to deteriorate. </p> <p> </p> <p>Nurse Maddie held an iPad for two hours so his children and in-laws could say their goodbyes and know he was comforted during his final moments. Frank’s wife and son were present at the hospital, watching from behind a glass door.  </p> <p> </p> <p>"If his family had been there, they would have wanted to hold and touch his hand and rub his head, so that’s what I did, one hand holding the iPad and the other providing the therapeutic touch that his family members weren’t able to.” — Maddie Hayes, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) nurse </p> <p> </p> <p>As we continue to fight the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Vanderbilt Health depends on the generous support from donors like you now more than ever before. Your support is providing health care heroes like Maddie with everything she needs to give patients and their families the care they need.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>“It was a tremendous thing that she did for us since we couldn’t be in the room. She was our only way to be there. I think my mom probably summed it up the best: Maddie was my dad’s angel in the room.” — Paul Rummo, Frank’s son</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Frank Rummo" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/rummo_frank.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 19:30:02 +0000 hallk19 165 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Taking Pediatric Cardiology to New Heights https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/khori <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Taking Pediatric Cardiology to New Heights</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 14:02</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/164" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Taking Pediatric Cardiology to New Heights"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Khori" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Khori%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>Taking Pediatric Cardiology to New Heights</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> Five-year-old Khori was born with a congenital heart defect and has already undergone two open-heart surgeries in her short life. After her second surgery, it was clear she would need a new heart, so she was placed on the transplant list. </h4> <p> </p> <p>Her mother Tomara was shocked when just three months later she received the call that a match had been found for her little girl. </p> <p> </p> <p>“When he said he was a member of the transplant team and that they’d found a match, I literally almost fell to the floor. I just started crying. They were happy tears, of course,” Tomara said. </p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>“Having all of our services housed in one place has always been a dream. It just makes sense when the day-to-day care of our patients is dependent on interactions with multiple divisions.” </em></strong><b><i>—</i></b><strong><em> Scott Baldwin, MD, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology and Co-Director of the Pediatric Heart Institute </em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Scott Baldwin" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Baldwin_Scott2.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Khori is one of the nearly 500 children who will receive a heart operation at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt annually. </p> <p> </p> <p>And now, thanks to the generous contributions of donors like you, children like Khori have a brand-new, state-of-the-art pediatric cardiology floor to meet all their needs in one place. The addition of the new tenth floor of Children’s Hospital encompasses all inpatient cardiology services, including the cardiac intensive care unit (ICU) and the cardiac step-down unit. </p> <p> </p> <p>Part of the Growing to New Heights campaign, the new 10th floor cardiology unit will make for a better patient experience as well as more positive outcomes. </p> <p> </p> <p>Your gifts help make innovations and advancements like this possible, ultimately changing the future of pediatric medicine. </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 19:02:11 +0000 hallk19 164 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org A New Kind of Heart Transplant https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/maurice-mcallister <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A New Kind of Heart Transplant</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 13:21</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/163" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to A New Kind of Heart Transplant"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Maurice McAllister" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Maurice%20McAllister%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><strong>A New Kind of Heart Transplant</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> At Vanderbilt Health, we understand that sometimes before we can save a patient’s life, we need to pioneer innovative, new ways to do that. Take Maurice McAllister, for instance. </h4> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WTOOMw7anCs"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>Just after turning 40, he found himself in an ambulance on his way to a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. After losing his wife to cancer, Maurice was a single parent, responsible for their two teenage daughters. I can’t die, he thought. Who will take care of my girls? </p> <p> </p> <p>Maurice’s best hope was to start working to lose the 30 pounds he needed to become eligible for a heart transplant. Unfortunately for Maurice and tens of thousands of Americans, the scarcity of suitable hearts for transplantation has resulted in a wait of 70 to 565 days. </p> <p> </p> <p>Using support from donors — including generous grateful patients — researchers at Vanderbilt Health pioneered a practice that has reduced the average wait to just four days. </p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Maurice McAllister" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/maurice-family.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>“Vanderbilt saved my life. I could have easily been told that there was nothing they could do for me. That’s why I will be forever grateful.” — Maurice McAllister, heart transplant patient </em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p>What was once unthinkable — using hearts from hepatitis C-infected donors to transplant noninfected recipients — has now broadened the donor pool, vastly increasing the number of heart transplant candidates who would otherwise die waiting on a new heart. </p> <p> </p> <p>Since fall 2016, Vanderbilt has performed 80 transplants using an innovative, new advance that makes hearts from hepatitis C-exposed donors suitable for transplantation. Each of those 80 hearts represents a patient who now has a second chance at life. </p> <p> </p> <p>Maurice McAllister was one of those recipients. </p> <p> </p> <p>“What is most rewarding is the opportunity to be a part of the journey for people like Maurice — I met him in the very beginning when he was dying of heart failure and now get to see him living again because of heart transplantation and what we’ve been able to offer him. Stories like his are why I do what I do.” — Kelly Schlendorf, MD, MHS, Medical director of the Adult Heart Transplant Program</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Kelly Schlendorf" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Kelly%20Schlendorf.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:21:33 +0000 hallk19 163 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Grateful Breast Cancer Survivor Gives Back https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/latonya-drumwright <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Grateful Breast Cancer Survivor Gives Back</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 13:10</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/162" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Grateful Breast Cancer Survivor Gives Back"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><img alt="Latonya" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Latonya%20Drumwright-VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /><h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>Grateful Breast Cancer Survivor Gives Back</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> Latonya Drumwright was expecting to pop in quickly for a routine mammogram on her lunch break—but when she found herself with a longer-than-usual wait after the exam, she had a feeling this visit may not be just a typical checkup.<br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UOAiRhY9eKw"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>When she was told they found something that didn’t look quite right, she took the rest of the day off from work to tell her husband, whose mother had died from breast cancer, that she, too, might have the disease. Later a biopsy would confirm Latonya’s fear—she was diagnosed with breast cancer.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Dr. Andrea Birch" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/DrBirchCrop.png" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>"I’m so grateful to donors because without your support, we wouldn’t be able to assist patients with this compassionate care." — Andrea Birch, M.D., Latonya's Radiologist</p> <p> </p> <p>After undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, targeted therapy and five surgeries, Latonya is now a breast cancer survivor and activist. With cancer now in her past thanks to the specialized care she received at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Latonya is an advocate for breast cancer screenings. She is a member of the Temple Church, where her husband, Rev. Darrell Drumwright, is the pastor, and they host "Pink Sunday” each October to raise awareness for breast cancer.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Latonya Drumwright" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Latonya%201.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>"The moment the doctor walked into the room and told me I was breast cancer free was the best moment of my life." — Latonya Drumwright, Breast Cancer Survivor</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p>“I am blessed," she says. "I am very blessed to be here thanks to my strong support system, which includes my family, friends, church family and the compassionate Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center medical team.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Thank you for making this life-changing care possible.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Latonya Drumwright" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Latonya_contentcrop2.png" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:10:54 +0000 hallk19 162 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Breakthroughs in Bloom https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/lilys-garden <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Breakthroughs in Bloom</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 12:19</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/161" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Breakthroughs in Bloom"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Lily%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>Breakthroughs in Bloom</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> At 7 years old, Lily Hensiek's biggest worries were homework and getting her ears pierced. But when she started complaining of back pain, experiencing fevers and bruising easily, her family began to worry. </h4> <p> </p> <p>One night when Lily woke up screaming in pain, her mother Larisa Featherstone knew something was terribly wrong. "As parents you know the cries of your children," she says. "This was a cry that I had never heard before." Lily was rushed to the hospital, and after a few days and tests, she was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).</p> <p> </p> <p>"I remember thinking this couldn't possibly be happening to my child," Larisa says. "This precious 7-year-old girl who was just doing cartwheels in her grandmother's yard could not have cancer."</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Lily%20-%20Summer%202009.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>At such a young age, Lily didn't understand what was happening. To explain it in a way she could understand, a doctor at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt told Lily that cancer was like a weed growing in a garden, and that they would use chemotherapy to kill the weeds, so flowers could bloom.</p> <p> </p> <p>"My name is Lily," she says. "So the garden analogy stuck."</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Lily1.jpeg" class="align-center" /><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Lily2_0.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>One day when Lily was in the hospital, she told her mom she wished no child would have to go through this again. “I asked her how much money she wanted to raise to make that happen, and she replied $100,” Larisa says. When her mom challenged her to come up with a higher goal, Lily decided on $1 million, and the idea for the Lily’s Garden initiative began. It was then that her family started focusing on raising funds and awareness for childhood cancer.</p> <p> </p> <p>After two and a half years of chemotherapy, Lily finished treatment, all the while still fundraising for a cure.</p> <p> </p> <p>"Over 90 percent of children with ALL are cured," says Debra Friedman, M.D., director of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Children's Hospital. "Most patients who relapse do so within two years. After five years, patients are pretty much considered home free."</p> <p> </p> <p>Unfortunately for Lily, that wasn't the case. At 15 years old, she started experiencing fevers again, and her mom brought her back to Children's Hospital. A bone marrow sample ultimately confirmed her family's greatest fear — Lily had relapsed.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Lily%20Mom.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>“Lily is tough as nails and never loses sight of what’s important. On the day we found out she relapsed, we were driving home, and I asked her what she was thinking. She looked at me and said she would do whatever she had to do to beat this and live out her dreams.” </em></strong><b><i>—</i></b><strong><em> Larisa Featherstone, Lily's mother</em></strong><br />  </p> <p>Those dreams include raising money for a cure and becoming a pediatric oncology nurse at Children’s Hospital, inspired by her dedicated medical team who have become like family.</p> <p> </p> <p>“Treatment has shaped my life in a way I never could have imagined,” Lily said. “I wouldn’t have started raising money through Lily’s Garden if I wasn’t diagnosed with cancer. I wouldn’t have wanted to become a pediatric oncology nurse. In a way, I’m thankful for the experience because it has shaped me in many ways.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Lily’s story goes further than her disease. Her community rallied around her in support, and Lily’s Garden has raised well over her initial goal of $1 million to support pediatric cancer efforts at Children’s Hospital.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Lily%203.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>"The moment I found out we hit our fundraising goal of $1 million, I was overjoyed. It was hard to put into words, but I didn't want to stop there. It was never about $1 million, it was about a cure for cancer." — Lily Hensiek, Pediatric Cancer Survivor</p> <p> </p> <p>Once her initial goal was met, Lily and her family contemplated what their next fundraising goal would be. After talking with Dr. Friedman, they decided that supporting an endowed fellowship would be a great way to make a lasting impact.</p> <p> </p> <p>“At Children’s Hospital, an essential part of our mission is clinical training for our fellows – the next generation of leaders in pediatric health care who will lead tomorrow’s discoveries,” Dr. Friedman said. “We are so grateful to Lily and her family for choosing to support the first endowed fellowship in pediatric hematology-oncology at Children’s Hospital, known as the Lily’s Garden Fellowship. This groundbreaking fellowship will make a difference for decades to come in the fight against childhood cancer.”</p> <p> </p> <p>The Lily’s Garden Fellowship was established in July 2018 and awarded to first-year fellow Brianna Nicole Smith, M.D., M.S., whose research focuses on novel therapies for leukemia and better treatment options with fewer side effects.</p> <p> </p> <p>“I will be able to become a better researcher and physician because of the Lily’s Garden Fellowship.” Dr. Smith said. “The extra training opportunities that are possible because of this fellowship will make a long-lasting impact on the field.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Now at 17 years old, Lily is in remission again. She still comes back to Children’s Hospital once a week for clinic and therapies, but she is nearing the end of treatment.</p> <p> </p> <p>“Fundraising has helped give our family a greater purpose, and we have been shown so much kindness. A lot of small gifts from different people added up to make those bigger goals possible,” Larisa said. “So even though there have been some weeds spreading in our story, there has been a whole lot of goodness spreading too.”</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Lily's Garden" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Lily%204.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:19:44 +0000 hallk19 161 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org The Unsung Heroes https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/dr-miller <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Unsung Heroes</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 11:44</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/159" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to The Unsung Heroes"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><img alt="The Unsung Heroes" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Dr.%20Miller-VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /><h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>The Unsung Heroes</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> The Vanderbilt Health trauma staff cares for thousands of patients each year, but the team was never expecting they would face three mass shootings in just seven months. <br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/s6_LGtJT3WI"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>As the only Level 1 Trauma Center for a catchment area of more than 65,000 square miles, Vanderbilt Health has one of the busiest trauma centers in the country. When tragedy strikes like it did in a nearby church, a Kentucky high school and a Waffle House restaurant, Richard S. Miller, M.D., Chief of the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, was able to mobilize nine trauma surgeons and an entire team to be down in the trauma bay and ready to go within 15 minutes. </p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Lifeflight" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/lifeflight_cropcc.png" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>"When you have a team of people that works well together, collaborates and helps each other through difficult times, that's priceless," Miller says. This lifesaving, comprehensive care would not be possible without passionate community supporters like you.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>"Most people, if they have the capacity, really want to do something to help. Those donors are our unsung heroes." </em></strong><b><i>—</i></b><strong><em> Richard S. Miller, M.D., Chief of the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care Carol Ann Gavin Directorship in Trauma and Surgical Critical Care</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Dr. Miller" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/DrMillerDog_edit.png" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Together we are giving hope and healing to patients who need us in our region and well beyond.</p> <p> </p> <p>Thank you.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 16:44:47 +0000 hallk19 159 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Back in the Game https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/drew-estes <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Back in the Game</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 11:34</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/158" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Back in the Game"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><img alt="Drew" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Drew%20Estes-VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /><h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>Back in the Game</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> In March 2016, all that should have been on seventh-grader Drew Estes’ mind was middle school baseball tryouts and basketball practice. But when he developed a persistent fever, his parents took him to the doctor to see what was wrong. <br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uKGfhvwgF8g"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>After a blood test revealed that his white blood cell count was zero, he was sent to the emergency room for more testing. A bone marrow biopsy ultimately confirmed that what was originally thought to be just a virus was actually much more serious: Drew was diagnosed with leukemia. His care team at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt quickly got to work on a treatment plan, and Drew started chemotherapy right away.</p> <p> </p> <p>"When we meet patients for the first time, and we tell them that they have a diagnosis of cancer, we know in that moment we are there to hopefully save that patient's life."<strong><em> </em></strong><i>—</i> Scott Borinstein, M.D., Ph.D., Drew's Oncologist</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Scott Borinstein" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Scott%20Borinstein.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p id="yui_3_17_2_1_1656347289284_24038">One of the biggest hurdles for Drew was giving up the sports that he loved. And although he lost the last nine weeks of his seventh-grade year, he finished from home and maintained all A’s. After four weeks of chemotherapy, Drew went into remission. He was able to return both to school and to the baseball team for his eighth-grade year. He is now doing great with his treatments, and he continues to handle every challenge that comes his way with strength.</p> <p> </p> <p><em><strong>"The moment I stepped back on the baseball field to play again, it just felt amazing because I was really excited to get back to doing what I love."</strong></em> <b><i>—</i></b><em><strong> Drew Estes, Pediatric Cancer Survivor</strong></em></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Drew Estes" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Drew%20Estes.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>“Knowing we have a state-of-the-art place like Children’s Hospital in our region is so comforting," Drew's mom, Jenny, says. "When this happened, we asked everyone we knew where the best place for treatment would be. We are sure that Children’s Hospital is right where we needed to be.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Thank you for making this life-changing care possible.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 16:34:07 +0000 hallk19 158 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org A Come-From-Behind Win https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/ron-duncan <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Come-From-Behind Win</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 10:44</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/157" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to A Come-From-Behind Win"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Ron Duncan" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Ron%20Duncan%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /> A Come-From-Behind Win</h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> At 53, Ron Duncan was a successful businessman who played multiple sports and considered himself to be in great health. But when he started having abdominal pain, he visited his doctor and received devastating news. What he thought was just a hernia from playing sports was much more serious.</h4> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qkiveM08ofg"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>Ron was diagnosed with peritoneal carcinomatosis, a cancer that originated in his appendix and spread throughout his abdominal area.</p> <p> </p> <p>When Ron researched this online, the common theme he saw was “terminal,” leaving him gripped with fear.</p> <p> </p> <p>But then he met Kamran Idrees, MD, MSCI, MMHC, director of Pancreas and GI Surgical Oncology and director of the Peritoneal Surface Malignancy Program at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.</p> <p> </p> <p>Dr. Idrees came to Vanderbilt-Ingram in 2012 to establish the hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) program to offer hope to patients with abdominal cancer. The highly specialized treatment combines surgery with heated chemotherapy delivered directly into the abdomen. </p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>"Building a successful program, such as the one at at our institution, could not have been possible without a true team effort and our incredible community of supporters. " </em></strong><b><i>—</i></b><strong><em> Kamran Idrees, MD, MSCI, MMHC, Ron’s Doctor at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Kamran Idrees" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Kamran%20Idrees.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>In April 2013, Ron underwent the surgery, and it saved his life. Now, six years later, he is back to playing softball double headers. Grateful for the care he received, Ron now raises funds for research and support for families dealing with cancer. </p> <p> </p> <p>Innovative treatments like this are available because of support from donors like you. Thank you for helping us give new hope to patients. </p> <p> </p> <p>"I have the most blessed life. I’ve been married to my wife Jill for 38 years. My sons are exquisite young men, and I love being a grandfather. Dr. Idrees and Vanderbilt gave me the gift of being around for my family." — Ron Duncan, Cancer Survivor </p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Ron Duncan" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Ron%20Duncan%20.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 15:44:04 +0000 hallk19 157 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Part of the Family https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/rickey-buggs <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Part of the Family</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 10:39</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/156" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Part of the Family"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Rickey Buggs" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Rickey%20Buggs%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>Part of the Family</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> “A parent’s worst nightmare” is how Lametra Scott, PharmD, CCHP, describes the moment her son Rickey was diagnosed with sickle cell disease, a blood disorder that can cause blood clots and severe pain.</h4> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> As a new mom, Lametra was scared and had a lot of questions. Fortunately, she had a highly specialized program nearby at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. <br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ThlA1eA3dGs"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>The Vanderbilt-Meharry Center for Excellence in Sickle Cell Disease is led by internationally renowned sickle cell expert Michael DeBaun, MD, MPH. </p> <p> </p> <p>“Dr. DeBaun, Ms. Jeannie Byrd and many others at Children’s Hospital have become part of our family,” said Lametra. “They treat you as a family member, a friend, a human being. And that speaks volumes to the personalized care they provide.” </p> <p> </p> <p>"By creating a medical home setting—a place of coordinated care—the Vanderbilt-Meharry Center of Excellence in Sickle Cell Disease decreases the burden on families and increases quality of care." — Michael DeBaun, MD, MPH, Rickey’s doctor </p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Michael DeBaun" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Michael%20DeBaun.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Today, Rickey continues to take medications and returns to see his friends at Children’s Hospital every three months for check-ups, but he isn’t letting sickle cell disease stand in his way. He is a fun-loving, fearless 6-year-old who loves dancing and martial arts. </p> <p> </p> <p>Looking to pay it forward for the care her family received, Lametra now educates others about the disease and says her family found a greater purpose in having a child diagnosed with sickle cell disease. She’s founded an organization that helps raise funds and awareness for community sickle cell advocacy. </p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>"Without Children’s Hospital, parents like me would be at a loss. All of the research, all of the treatments and all of the care—none of it could take place without generous donations." — Lametra Scott, PharmD, CCHP, Rickey’s Mom</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Rickey Buggs Mom" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Rickey%20Buggs%20Mom.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <p>World-class programs like this exist because of support from donors like you. Thank you for making a difference for patients like Rickey.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 15:39:09 +0000 hallk19 156 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org A New Life After Breast Cancer https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/jocelyn-limmer <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A New Life After Breast Cancer</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 10:26</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/155" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to A New Life After Breast Cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><img alt="Jocelyn" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Jocelyn%20Limmer-VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /><h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>A New Life After Breast Cancer</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> Jocelyn and Ted Limmer were ecstatic when they found out they were expecting. It was right before their third wedding anniversary, and the couple describes it as the greatest moment of their lives. </h4> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> But on her first obstetrician visit, Jocelyn mentioned a lump in her breast, thinking it was due to her pregnancy. After a biopsy, Jocelyn learned she had invasive ductal carcinoma, triple negative, stage 2 breast cancer. <br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/syRnFvfjP-o"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>“Being told ‘you have cancer’ right after finding out you’re pregnant, it was a total shock,” said Jocelyn. </p> <p> </p> <p>The Limmers were left with an important decision — where to receive care. </p> <p> </p> <p>They knew they would need the best care possible, ensuring both mother and baby’s care. They knew there was only one place to go, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.  </p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>“Cancer seems to always be seen as someone else’s disease, until you’re faced with it. It turns your world around. Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center was great. It was wonderful to go to one facility.” — Ted Limmer, Jocelyn’s husband</em></strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Jocelyn began chemotherapy in her second trimester. Her doctor, Vandana Abramson, made sure to coordinate and meet with her obstetrician face-to-face regularly, making sure everyone was on the same page. </p> <p> </p> <p>Both Jocelyn’s pregnancy and cancer treatment went smoothly until Charlotte (Charlie) came early at 33 weeks via C-section. She was delivered after her ninth chemo treatment, and she returned for her last treatment three weeks later. </p> <p> </p> <p>Charlie was able to be there with her for her final treatment and when she rang the bell. Although Jocelyn continued to receive treatment, including a double mastectomy, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center gave her two things she will never forget: a beautiful baby and the chance to be there for Charlie as she grows up. </p> <p> </p> <p>Your support helps mothers like Jocelyn beat breast cancer and gives more children like Charlie the chance to grow up with a mother. </p> <p> </p> <p>“The moment I met Dr. Abramson, she had a plan, she knew exactly what she needed to do. She really set my mind at ease, knowing that Charlie would be okay and that I would be okay.”  — Jocelyn Limmer, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Patient</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="Jocelyn Limmer" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Jocelyn%20Limmer%202.jpeg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 15:26:32 +0000 hallk19 155 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org A Gift That Could Give a New Voice to Deaf Children https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/tharpe <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Gift That Could Give a New Voice to Deaf Children</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/hallk19" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hallk19</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 09:53</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/154" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to A Gift That Could Give a New Voice to Deaf Children"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-center"><img alt="Anne Marie Tharpe and Jim Kramka" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Dr.%20Tharpe%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" width="850" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center"><strong>A Gift That Could Give a New Voice to Deaf Children</strong></h1> <p> </p> <p class="text-align-center">Anne Marie Tharpe, PhD, and her husband, Jim Kramka, are making a gift to VUMC through their wills in honor of Tharpe’s late father.</p> <p><br /><style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]]]><![CDATA[>*/ /*--><!]]>*/ </style></p> <center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rSH2q03rJis"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>What began as a high school volunteer project would eventually lead Anne Marie Tharpe, PhD, to a career devoted to understanding and mitigating the impact of hearing loss in children. </p> <p> </p> <p>Dr. Tharpe — now chair of the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, associate director of the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, and a worldwide authority on pediatric hearing loss — is ensuring that work endures and grows. And to continue that legacy long into the future, she and her husband Jim Kramka, senior director for Housing Facilities Operations and Management at Vanderbilt University, are making a gift to Vanderbilt Health through their wills in honor of her late father, the Honorable James M. Tharpe.</p> <p> </p> <p>The James M. Tharpe Fund for Pediatric Communication Disorders will support endowed research and directorships in the divisions within the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences that serve children.</p> <p> </p> <p>Tharpe earned her master’s and doctoral degrees from Vanderbilt, and since 2009 has been associate director of the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center and chair of the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences.</p> <p> </p> <p>Tharpe envisions a world where hearing loss is treated with genetic medicine and fully implantable devices will supplant devices worn outside the body. Her generous gift will support that future research, as well as offering financial assistance for families who use services such as the Mama Lere Hearing School, a preschool for children with hearing loss.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>“I don’t see this gift as perpetuating my work as much as helping the department continue to move forward,” she said. “The work that we do here…provides hope and opportunities, and enhances the lives of individuals who have more struggles than most of us.”</em></strong></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 14:53:25 +0000 hallk19 154 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org William and Frances Blot Deed Home to VUMC to Benefit Cancer Patients https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/blot <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">William and Frances Blot Deed Home to VUMC to Benefit Cancer Patients</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/josephe" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">josephe</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 04/25/2022 - 11:35</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/153" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to William and Frances Blot Deed Home to VUMC to Benefit Cancer Patients"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-center"><img alt="Blot" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Blog-Header-1920x900.jpg" width="850" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center"><strong>William and Frances Blot Deed Home to VUMC<br /> to Benefit Cancer Patients</strong><br />  </h1> <p>Their condominium in The Westbury was at the heart of all that William and Frances Blot loved about Nashville — its proximity to Vanderbilt where he worked for two decades, its sidewalk that led to the greenspaces where they would watch the seasons change, and its residents who became more like friends than neighbors.<br />  </p> <p>When William Blot became emeritus professor of Medicine this spring, the Blots moved away from Nashville and gave from their hearts, deeding their home to Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The proceeds from its sale created a charitable remainder trust to establish the Frances D. and William J. Blot Cancer Fund to support patient care initiatives, research endeavors and training of the next generation of scientists at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC).<br />  </p> <p>“I’m so glad we did this,” said Frances Blot. “We loved being in Nashville and all the people we knew on the Vanderbilt staff, the professors and the students. We don’t know the new people who moved in the condominium, but we do know that the sale is helping Vanderbilt, and that makes us really happy.”<br />  </p> <p>William Blot, PhD, served as associate director of Population Sciences Research at VICC until his April 1 retirement. He joins many other faculty who have served VUMC and chosen to extend their impact through philanthropic support.<br />  </p> <p>“We are great admirers of the program that Jennifer Pietenpol, PhD, and colleagues have developed,” he said. “Having been part of the leadership as an associate director, I have over the years seen the need for increased funding. We figured that since we weren’t going to be using our condominium anymore in Nashville, this would be contributing in a small way.”</p> <p><br /> William Blot came to Vanderbilt in 2000 to help establish a cancer epidemiology program. The program has grown from a handful of employees to a staff approaching 100. Blot and Margaret Hargreaves, PhD, cofounded the landmark Southern Community Cohort Study, one of the nation’s largest epidemiologic studies, to assess the reasons for racial and geographic disparities in cancer incidence and mortality. The study has received continuous funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 2001 and has played a role in changes to public health policy, including the recent decision by the United States Preventive Services Task Force to lower the age and smoking history recommendations for lung screenings.<br />  </p> <p><strong><em>“This is a generous and much-appreciated gift from Bill and Frances Blot. Dr. Blot has already given so much to Vanderbilt-Ingram through his leadership and establishing a world-class cancer epidemiology program.” </em></strong><b><i>—</i></b><strong><em> Jennifer Pietenpol, PhD, B.F. Byrd Jr. Professor of Oncology, director of VICC, Executive Vice President for Research at VUMC and holder of the Brock Family Directorship in Career Development</em></strong><br />  </p> <p>“His research has yielded key discoveries regarding the distribution, determinants and means of preventing human cancers. He has created platforms that have accelerated discoveries impacting the health and welfare of communities in the U.S. and around the world. The Frances D. and William J. Blot Cancer Fund will support continued progress in these efforts as we work to lessen the burden of cancer in this region and beyond,” Pietenpol said.<br />  </p> <p>Orrin H. Ingram II, chair of the VICC Board of Overseers, also noted Blot’s leadership and commitment.<br />  </p> <p>“Not only does Bill give back through his cutting-edge research, but he and Fran give back through their philanthropy in supporting young investigators’ research. This early-stage funding is so critical, as most federal and institutional grants require research to be further developed before funding is considered,” said Ingram.<br />  </p> <p>Blot began his career working in Hiroshima, Japan, for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission after completing an undergraduate degree in mathematics from the University of Florida, where he and Frances met in a classroom, and then a PhD in statistics from Florida State University. “I got introduced into the field of medical statistics and epidemiology and discovered that’s where I wanted to be rather than as a mathematician or statistician,” he said.<br />  </p> <p>Blot then worked at The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health before joining the NCI for 20 years, where he served as chief of the Biostatistics Branch. He left the NCI and cofounded the International Epidemiology Institute. The company contracted with Vanderbilt to develop a research portfolio in cancer epidemiology and to recruit staff, a relationship that led to Blot’s appointment as a Vanderbilt professor.<br />  </p> <p>“The first grant application we submitted toward the end of 2000 was for the Southern Community Cohort Study,” he said. “Lo and behold, that got funded on the first go-around. We also were fortunate to recruit epidemiologists Wei Zheng, MD, PhD, and Xiao-Ou Shu, MD, PhD. Suddenly, Vanderbilt went from maybe one or two part-time people engaged in cancer epidemiology to a core group of over a dozen people. We established a track record of funding for epidemiologic research that moved Vanderbilt from almost nowhere on the list to close to the top in about a year-and-a-half period. It was a remarkable period of transition.”<br />  </p> <p>The Blots are now enjoying retirement at their home in Chevy Chase, Maryland, near their daughter, son and three grandchildren, and at their condominium in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 25 Apr 2022 16:35:24 +0000 josephe 153 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Gift Highlights Strong, Lasting Bond between Patients & Healers https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/baker <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Gift Highlights Strong, Lasting Bond between Patients &amp; Healers</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/josephe" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">josephe</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 04/25/2022 - 11:19</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/152" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Gift Highlights Strong, Lasting Bond between Patients &amp; Healers"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Karen Kendrick-Baker" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/%28Karen%20Kendrick-Baker%29%20VH.org%20Blog%20Stories%20-%20Headers.png" class="align-center" /></p> <h1 class="text-align-center"><strong>Gift Highlights Strong, Lasting Bond between Patients &amp; Healers</strong></h1> <p class="text-align-center"> </p> <p>For many Vanderbilt University Medical Center patients, expressing gratitude for their health often takes a philanthropic turn, leaving both the patient and the physician feeling fulfilled.</p> <p> </p> <p>And sometimes patients choose to honor their physicians with longer-term financial planning. Karen Kendrick-Baker and her husband, Jerry, of Manchester, Tennessee, think so highly of their Vanderbilt physicians that they have included the Medical Center in their estate planning.<br />  </p> <p>“We have no children and have a very small family. When I thought about the thing that most impacts my life, I thought of Vanderbilt and Dr. Jagasia,” she said.</p> <p><br /> Shubhada Jagasia, M.D., MMHC, professor of Medicine, has been Kendrick-Baker’s physician since 1999 when she first saw her as a resident. Kendrick-Baker has had type 1 diabetes since she was 17. Her husband sees Syeda Zaidi, M.D., assistant professor of Medicine.</p> <p> </p> <p>“Dr. Jagasia is well educated and credentialed, but I believe you need a person-to-person connection with your doctor, and let’s face it, that’s not always a given,” said Kendrick-Baker. “Dr. Jagasia is compassionate and very earnest. She’s referred me to specialists when needed. Our relationship is trust, upon trust, upon trust.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Before she committed to the financial gift, Kendrick-Baker was given a tour of the Vanderbilt Diabetes Research Center.</p> <p> </p> <p>“I already felt good about my decision, but that made me even more sure. There's an incredible amount of work going on there,” she said.<br />  </p> <h4><em><strong>"I went home and told my husband, ‘we’ve done the right thing. We’ve put our assets where they’re going to do the most good.’ It all started with Dr. Jagasia and the trust I have in her.” </strong></em><b><i>— Karen Kendrick-Baker</i></b></h4> <p><br /> Jagasia said she feels “humbled and grateful” by the gift to Vanderbilt made in her honor. “It highlights what a noble profession medicine is, and I’m honored that someone would consider including me in such a personal decision."</p> <p> </p> <p>“The qualities that make a good doctor are honesty, humility and integrity. It’s important for physicians who treat chronic disease to not only be empathetic, but also objective. It can be a difficult balance for physicians to reach. You should be a peer, coach and friend, but when necessary, be able to step outside of those roles and say ‘as your doctor, this is what I think,’” Jagasia said.</p> <p> </p> <p>But she emphasized that the care provided in Vanderbilt’s Eskind Diabetes Center is a team effort with highly trained subspecialists, nurse practitioners, certified diabetes educators and dietitians playing equally important roles in the care of patients.</p> <p> </p> <p>Jagasia said she is fortunate to have long-term relationships with her patients because she treats them through all of the phases of their lives. “I often see patients through pregnancy, child bearing, acute illness, personal challenges and through the ups and downs,” she said.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 25 Apr 2022 16:19:09 +0000 josephe 152 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org An Accidental Discovery https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/jordan-johnson <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">An Accidental Discovery</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/monroe-carell-jr-childrens-hospital-vanderbilt-stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/josephe" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">josephe</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 04/04/2022 - 11:38</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/150" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to An Accidental Discovery"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h1 class="text-align-center"><img alt="Johnson Family" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Blog%20Content/Jordan-Johnson-Blog-header2.jpg" /></h1> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649090347465_704"><br /><strong>An Accidental Discovery</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> After getting hit in the head with a baseball, a scan revealed that Jordan had a cerebral cavernous malformation -- a large tumor on his brain. After researching the best programs in the country, the Johnsons decided that the neurosurgery team at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt was the right choice. <br /><br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 75%; } /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/amudXYDMmm0"></iframe></div> </center> <p> </p> <p>When 15-year-old Jordan Johnson was struck by a baseball during a game in June 2020, he never imagined the hit would end up saving his life.<br />  </p> <p>After the injury, Jordan’s parents Jeff and Ivette took him to Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt to make sure everything was okay. They were shocked when a scan revealed that Jordan had a giant cerebral cavernous malformation — that is, an abnormal grouping of small blood vessels inside of his brain stem. The lesion had likely been there since birth, gradually growing over time — and by the time Jordan suffered the hit, the lesion had reached a critical size. The options were to continue to let it grow, with the possibility of life-threatening rupture, or to remove it with a high-risk surgery.<br />  </p> <h4><strong><em>“We are so thankful that we had this world-class hospital and surgeon right in our backyard.” </em></strong><strong><em>— Ivette Johnson,</em> <em>Jordan’s Mom</em></strong></h4> <p><br /> Because the lesion was inside the brain stem, a major concern was Jordan’s ability to move and communicate. His parents say their biggest questions were, “Are we going to get our Jordan back? The Jordan he was before surgery?”</p> <p><br /> After researching the best programs in the country, the Johnsons decided that the neurosurgery team at Children's Hospital, led by John C. (Jay) Wellons III, MD, MSPH, was the right choice.</p> <p><br /> “We were just a typical family with a typical life,” said Jordan’s dad Jeff. “Our lives consisted of travel ball, school band performances and family vacations to Disney World. We would have never believed that our son would ever have to have brain surgery.”</p> <p><br /> Jordan’s condition required an eight-hour brain surgery, followed by two weeks of recovery in the hospital. After that, he began his journey to rehabilitation — he would have to relearn everything, from how to eat to how to walk. Throughout the healing process, Jordan grew especially close to Dr. Wellons, who performed his surgery. As Chief of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dr. Wellons was awarded the inaugural Cal Turner Chair in Pediatric Neurosurgery in 2020.</p> <p><br /> “Jordan is an inspiring young man,” said Dr. Wellons. “He has handled a very challenging diagnosis and recovery with grit and determination." Now a year out from surgery, Jordan is home and receiving outpatient physical therapy. “I think I’m doing great because after surgery, I couldn’t even brush my teeth, and now I can solve my Rubik’s cube," said Jordan. “My goal is to walk on my own and play sports again, and I know that with hard work, I can do anything.”</p> <p><br /> “We are so thankful that we had this world-class hospital and surgeon right in our backyard,” said Jordan’s mom, Ivette. “Because of that, we have our Jordan back. We were recently able to celebrate his sixteenth birthday, and we’ll get to watch him graduate, go to college and be whatever he wants to be.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 04 Apr 2022 16:38:54 +0000 josephe 150 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org Devastating Crash Leads Family to Support Vanderbilt Trauma Team https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/owen-canavan <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Devastating Crash Leads Family to Support Vanderbilt Trauma Team</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/stories?cat=42" hreflang="en">Impact Report</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/josephe" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">josephe</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 04/04/2022 - 11:17</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/148" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Devastating Crash Leads Family to Support Vanderbilt Trauma Team"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h1 class="text-align-center"><img alt="Owen Canavan" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vanderbilthealth.org/sites/default/files/Blog%20Content/OwenHeader.jpg" /></h1> <h1 class="text-align-center" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1649089078292_702"><br /><strong>Devastating Crash Leads Family to Support<br /> Vanderbilt Trauma Team</strong></h1> <h4 class="text-align-center"><br /> A freak accident sent Owen to Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Trauma Intensive Care Unit. Thanks to the care he received at Vanderbilt, he eventually was able to return to the gym.<br /><br />  </h4> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 75%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } /*--><!]]>*/ </style><center> <div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/REpBDuRnzas"></iframe></div> </center> <h3 class="text-align-center"> </h3> <p>On April 7, 2017, a freak accident sent Owen Canavan to Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Trauma Intensive Care Unit. After a car crashed through the window of his gym and pinned him to the wall, Owen was rushed to Vanderbilt University Medical Center in critical condition, eventually requiring eight surgeries to repair a shattered femur, a ruptured spleen and extensive injuries to his pelvis and lower abdomen.</p> <p><br /> “The doctors and the nurses on the 10th floor in the trauma center at VUMC were, and will always remain my heroes,” said Owen, who along with his family established an endowment in his name that will benefit the VUMC Trauma program.</p> <p><br /> “When we receive trauma patients, especially ones who are injured so violently, there is a typical sense that even if they recover, they’ll never fully recover,” said Oscar Guillamondegui, MD, MPH, professor of Surgery, chief of the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care for the Department of Surgery, who was part of Owen’s care team along with Rick Miller, MD, former chief of the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, and Manny Sethi, MD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. Owen’s parents flew to Nashville right away and started asking family members and friends to pray for their son. In just two weeks, Owen was in a stepdown unit, making significant progress.</p> <p><br /> “You know, they always have to tell you the worst-case scenario that could happen, and every time he (Owen) had a procedure, which were all life-threatening, what ended up happening was the best possible outcome,” said Owen’s mother, Beth.</p> <p><br /> On his birthday, March 5, 2019 — nearly two years after the accident — Owen proved to himself he was finally ready to put the past behind him. “I went back to the gym, and it was really emotional, but I just took it slow, and I’ve been there ever since, continuing to make progress,” he said.</p> <p><br /> “Not everyone can do the work that the Trauma staff does. It’s extraordinary, and the fact that they do it day in and day out still puts me in awe.” —<b><i> </i></b>Beth Canavan, Owen’s mom</p> <p><br /> In thanks for Owen’s stellar treatment and successful recovery, the Canavans decided they would help support future trauma team members. Owen’s parents — Beth Owen Canavan and Karl Burgess Canavan — made a charitable contribution to VUMC to establish the Owen Burgess Canavan Fellowship Fund. The gift will support the fellowship program in the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care.</p> <h4><br /><em><strong>Owen says, “The fact that I can exercise and live life without pain is truly incredible and a testament to the quality of care I received, which includes all the trauma doctors and nurses who were rooting for me all the way.”</strong></em></h4> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 04 Apr 2022 16:17:53 +0000 josephe 148 at https://www.vanderbilthealth.org